Important distinctions between Y2K and Peak Oil

This post is actually a repost (without permission) of a thread I was reading on the Peak Oil discussion group, ROE2 (Running on Empty 2). Just another example of the great minds that are gathering to do something (hopefully) to have a positive impact for the future (of which I was again reminded by the weather abruptly turning cold here, and freezing as the result of trying to stay warm with only a small space heater and some winter clothes). Re: Y2K,was Re: Alternate Energies Posted by: “J libby” jlibby331

Thu Oct 19, 2006 4:35 pm (PST)

Y2K would never have been a civilization ending disaster. I suppose worse case scenario, it migh have caused a major recession, but we would have recovered qucikly. As mentioned here some time ago, I worked on banking software in the late 80s and we were making changes to software than. At that time, many programs couldn’t handle 30 year loans because of the 2 digit dates. But it certainly didn’t bring the mortgage loan business to a halt. Things that didn’t get fixed quick enough caused billing problems, but it all got worked out without causing major problems. The same would have been true of Y2K, if things weren’t fixed quick enough, there would be problems. But much effort and money were put into the problem by government and business to fix the problems. But they were known problems and people knew how to fix them. The media is what created the hype on Y2K. You don’t see that on PO. Continue reading

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IMF’s fears over [world] economy must be heeded

A long-argued thesis of mine, here is yet more support. It’s too bad there’s no mention of Peak Oil or Global Warming/Climate Change here, though. These are no doubt the two greatest challenges (or, to be more specific, apocalyptic calamities) that will grind civilization either to dust (population-wise) and destroy much of the technology and information we’ve accrued during the Age of Oil.

And it should be obvious to most of you that not too many people are doing anything about it.

The Six Stages of Job Loss
Stage 1: Shock and Denial
Stage 2: Fear and Panic
Stage 3: Anger
Stage 4: Bargaining
Stage 5: Depression
Stage 6: Temporary Acceptance

You ready for it? Who or what will you stand for, in the end? What message will your life and death be sending out to those around you?


Sorry about the delay in posting, for those of you who were on my feed; I’m now back in school to finish my bachelor’s. I’m also hoping to get Part 2 of the “Second Coming” series out by today. [update: okay, maybe by Saturday]
http://tinyurl.com/s3dm5
[note: taken from google news, where it seems the actual fears are far from the dominating header, as would be expected]

You can’t expect the International Monetary Fund to come out and say the world is headed for a global financial crash. And it isn’t saying that.

But what it is saying, in its own careful way, is that the risk of such a calamity is increasing.

Continue reading

BP says Prudhoe Bay output down 90,000 bpd on hitch

After seeing this headline while riding in a high-rise elevator, I knew something was amiss. A little jogging of the memory and a little bit more googling got me to this webpage, which mentions in point 23 at about a third down the page: Prudhoe Bay has been in decline for the last 18 years.

Corporate propaganda, plain and simple (although the listed reason may have the slightest ring of truth).

via Reuters.

ANCHORAGE, Alaska, Aug 23 (Reuters) – BP Plc said on Wednesday that oil production at its Prudhoe Bay oilfield in Alaska, already running at half capacity due to pipeline corrosion, has been cut by 90,000 barrels per day (bpd) for several days due to a technical fault. A company spokesman said output at the biggest oilfield in the United States had been reduced to 110,000 bpd after a natural gas compressor in Gathering Centre 2 failed.

“We anticipate that fixing the compressor will require several days,” said BP spokesman Daren Beaudo.

Continue reading

Power cut off in wide areas of Tokyo

I’ve always thought that Japan would probably be the number two country (behind the US) in trouble due to its energy import profile, even in spite of their extensive energy conservation measures and leadership. Remember, this is the country where many (energy-wise) highly-unrealistic visions of the future have been coming (at least for the later part of the 20th century).Can this be taken as evidence of an imminent decline?

http://tinyurl.com/kd378

TOKYO – A power outage hit wide swaths of Tokyo and nearby Chiba early Monday, halting train service in some areas, news reports said. It was not immediately clear what caused the power to be cut off.

At least two elevators stopped in central Tokyo with an unspecified number of people inside in the blackout, according to Tokyo fire official Keisuke Hayashi. He could not provide other details, saying officials were investigating the extent of the damage.

Media reports said that several trains services were halted. Japan was in the middle of a holiday, and the number of passengers during the morning rush hour was fewer than usual.

Public broadcaster NHK said that about 670,000 houses and other buildings were without power as of 8:15 a.m. local time.

Scarcity, the mother of invention

Yet another argument for human innovation and ingenuity. Ladies and gentlemen, look no further than Japan for a realistic perspective on human innovation for the last 30 years.
Moreover, if there have been wars over salt, why be so quick to rule one out over oil? Granted, there are far more NWO/secret-society complications with the onset of the current nation-state arrangement, but the pattern of the rape and pillaging of defenseless countries and their peoples continues, doesn’t it?

found at Energybulletin: http://energybulletin.net/19220.html

by Stephen L. Sass, NY Times
via International Herald Tribune

In the wake of the closure of a BP oil field in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, oil prices shot up to $77 a barrel on Wednesday, and the chorus of doomsayers concerned about the dire consequences of our fossil fuel dependency has reached a crescendo. If oil hits $100 a barrel, the impact on the economy could be catastrophic, the handwringers warn. But while such a specter seems novel and terrifying, it is in fact familiar and useful.

Throughout history, shortages of vital resources have driven innovation, and energy has often starred in these technological dramas. The search for new sources of energy and new materials has frequently produced remarkable advances that no one could have imagined when the shortage first became evident.

Continue reading