Rich nations seek stable global path

The problem with economics educations these days is that the most important points – such as market failure (e.g., failure to account for the cost of polluting mutually beneficial community space) – become so marginalized they eventually become tossed by the roadside of free-marketeerism. [google: environmental economists]

And so we fall into the sheeple mentality where “our leaders” will do something about it. “Our leaders” will stand for us. “Our leaders” will protect us, etc.

Leaders can include all types of people, and they’re not necessarily evil. But when people such as the President or pastors are looked at as “lifelong” or even just “life” leaders, we’ve got a big problem.

That is why I write this blog. I want to challenge you to think independently, think logically (e.g., why trust the government vs. “just don’t trust the government”), and to seek God’s guidance and Jesus’ example in thinking correctly (or alternatively, with moral responsibility).

99.9% of our “leaders” lack this attitude, and that is why the continued exploitation of the poor, among many other injustices, will continue to the very end of the Age.

New York Times via International Herald Tribune.

By Steven R. Weisman The New York Times
SEPTEMBER 17, 2006

SINGAPORE Even before the conclusion of the annual gathering of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, a striking swing in the global order has been obvious. China and other fast-growing developing countries are demanding a bigger say in the aging institutions that superintend the world economy.

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Situation in Zim ‘tragic’ – IMF

Some more bright news from everyone’s favorite slave-state inducing economists at the IMF:

1200%, people. That means your 50 cent bag of chips in the vending machine would now cost $4; your gas would cost $36/gal. In addition there’s a drought. So the potato field you would plant in response to the prevention of your family’s starvation would be decimated.

I wish I could get some statistics on current worldwide droughts (read my post on the drought in the Amazon), because “modern agriculture” is in response tapping underground water tables and freshwater streams en masse (in addition to multinational corporations like Coke and Pepsi), which is causing rapid decreases of water supplies in many places.

This means:

  • In probably 20-30 years, no more underground water reserves in many areas.
  • Prolonged droughts will become the norm for many areas.
  • Without sufficient transport (oil-powered trucks or boats), many will be forced to immigrate or starve.
  • Due to massive immigration, many countries already above carrying capacity will have to shoulder the load of more illegals as well as feeding their own populations.
  • What will probably happen is point 3.

The Age of Cheap Oil is over. Any suggestions as for what we should do?
http://www.news24.com/News24/Africa/Zimbabwe/0,,2-11-1662_2000057,00.html

Singapore – The economic prospects for Zimbabwe are “grim”, the International Monetary Fund said on Saturday, after data from the southern African nation showed annual inflation rose to a record high above 1 200% in August.

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